Lifestyle Enhancers

Eat Instead of Taking Vitamins

Most experts say that if you’re eating a healthy diet and don’t have an underlying health conditions that interferes with your body’s ability to absorb nutrients from your food, you generally shouldn’t need to take supplements. The same vitamins and minerals are often available in food. We’ve listed several popular supplements, and suggested food that you should eat instead.

Vitamin C

Citrus fruits are some of the best sources of vitamin C, which acts as an antioxidant in the body and helps with the absorption of iron. Oranges in particular are high in vitamin C—one large orange boasts 97.9 mg. It’s recommended that adult men get 90mg of vitamin C a day and women get 75 mg. Other high sources are red and green peppers, kiwi and tomatoes.

Calcium

Kale may be a less obvious choice, but it’s a high source of calcium that’s needed for strong bones and teeth as well as muscle movement and nerve function. Just one serving of kale has 150 mg of calcium which is slightly over 10% of the recommended daily amount. Other sources of calcium are dairy products like yoghurt, as well as other foods like broccoli and chia seeds.

 

B Vitamins

Vitamin B12 is commonly taken in supplement form since it’s important for red blood cell formation and neurological function. Eggs are a good source, and nutritional experts recently confirmed that eggs shouldn’t be chastised for being high in cholesterol. One large hard boiled egg has 0.6 micrograms of B12, which is about 10% of the recommended daily value. Just 3 oz of trout or salmon give you almost your entire daily needs.

In addition, vitamin B6 which is involved in metabolism and brain development during pregnancy is found in foods like nuts, tuna and chickpeas.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is important for vision, immune system function, reproduction and support for the heart, lungs and kidneys. Sweet potatoes are a particularly potent source of vitamin A. Just one sweet potato baked in the skin has 28,058 international units (IU) of vitamin A per serving, which is 561% of the daily recommended value.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E acts as an antioxidant in the body and supports the immune system in fighting off bacteria and viruses. Almonds, as well as other nuts like peanuts and hazelnuts are high sources of vitamin E. One ounce of dry roasted almonds contains 6.8 mg of vitamin A, which is 34% of the daily recommended value.

 

Magnesium

Cashews are a high source of magnesium, which is important for regulating blood sugar and blood pressure levels as well as maintaining nerve function. Not only are cashews tasty, but one ounce of dry roasted cashews host 74 mg of magnesium—19% of the daily recommended amount.

 

Iron

Half of cup of boiled and drained spinach has 3 mg of iron which comes out to around 17% of the daily recommended amount.

 

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a tricky nutrient. It’s available in very few foods, though fatty fish like salmon and tuna contain it. Lots of foods are fortified with Vitamin D, which is needed for calcium absorption and cell growth. Three ounces of cooked salmon contains 447 IUs (international units) of vitamin D which is 112% of the daily recommended value. People can also get vitamin D from sun exposure.

 

Multivitamin

Eating a variety of fruits and vegetables can ensure that you are getting the nutrients you need.

Cheers to a happy Belly & good health

Why Berries Are Among the Healthiest Foods on Earth

Berries are among the healthiest foods you can eat.

They’re delicious, nutritious, and provide a number of impressive health benefits.

Loaded with antioxidants

Berries contain antioxidants, which help keep free radicals under control.

Free radicals are unstable molecules that are beneficial in small amounts but can damage your cells when their numbers get too high, causing oxidative stress.

One study showed that blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries have the highest antioxidant activity of commonly consumed fruits, next to pomegranates.

May help improve blood sugar and insulin response

Berries may improve your blood sugar and insulin levels.

High in fibre

Berries are a good source of fibre, including soluble fibre. Studies show that consuming soluble fibre slows down the movement of food through your digestive tract, leading to reduced hunger and increased feelings of fullness.

Here are the carb and fibre counts for 100 grams of berries:

  • Raspberries: 11.9 grams of carbs, 6.5 of which are fibre

  • Blackberries: 10.2 grams of carbs, 5.3 of which are fibre

  • Strawberries: 7.7 grams of carbs, 2.0 of which are fibre

  • Blueberries: 14.5 grams of carbs, 2.4 of which are fibre

Note that a typical serving size for berries is 1 cup, which converts to about 125–150 grams depending on the type.

So, here is a good start to why eating berries are important.

 

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